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Posts Tagged as "math joy"

Sat 8/5 in Bridgehampton, Long Island – How to make math magical (for parents)

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

You are invited to join me for:

Making Math Magical: How to End the Math Freak-out and Raise a Math-Confident Child
on Saturday 8/5
at the Hampton Library in Bridgehampton, Long Island!

For Parents & Guardians

Math can be a big source of parental anxiety, where even math-confident parents can find themselves stuck when it comes to supporting their child.

In this workshop, math mastery mentor and joyful learning expert Rebecca Zook will provide you with groundbreaking tools to build and nurture your child’s math confidence.

Learn how to support your child to achieve mastery, rise to the top of their class, and in time experience math as a source of joy and self-expression.

Walk away with clear steps, case studies, and tools you can use to ensure math confidence.

This talk is for: parents and guardians of kids from 4th-12th grade
Talk title: Making Math Magical: Raising a Math Confident Child
Date: Saturday, August 05, 2017
Time: 3:00pm
Location: Hampton Library
2478 Main St,
Bridgehampton, NY 11932

Come and join me! Tell your friends!

And YES, my cello will be coming to help with the presentation!

#Bridgehampton #HamptonLibrary #LI #LongIsland #makingmathmagical #mathmastery #backtoschool #mathforparents #mathworkshopforparents #mathjoy #mathanxiety #endthemathfreakout #raiseamathconfidentchild

PS. This will be my *last* presentation until I return from recording and performing with my cello in Iceland in mid-September!

Posts Tagged as "math joy"

Mon 7/24 in Bernardsville, NJ – How to Make Math Magical this Summer

Friday, July 21st, 2017

This Monday, 7/24, I’ll be speaking to parents at the Bernardsville, NJ public library about How to Make Math Magical this Summer!

While summer is the perfect time to catch up on math or get ahead, students typically lose 2.6 months of grade level learning in math each summer.

Come learn how you can use the summer so your child can catch up or get ahead with math without having it be a boring, stressful chore.

Presented by Rebecca Zook, a math mastery mentor and joyful learning expert with over 13 years of experience as a thought leader on the cutting edge of math education.

This program is for parents of students in 4th grade through high school.

Talk title: How to Make Math Magical this Summer
This talk is for: parents of students in 4th grade through high school

Date: Mon 7/24
Time: 7 pm
Location: Bernardsville Public Library
1 Anderson Hill Road
Bernardsville, NJ 07924

Cost: Free and open to the public!

And in case you were wondering, there WILL be cello!

Come and join me – and please share with friends who might need help making math magical this summer!

#Bernardsville #NJ #BernardsvillePublicLibrary #makingmathmagical #summermath #mathforparents #mathworkshop #mathconfidence #mathmastery #mathanxiety #mathjoy

Posts Tagged as "math joy"

Tues 7/11 in Park Slope, Brooklyn – How to Make Math Magical This Summer

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Tonight,

Tues 7/11 @ 6.30-8 pm,

I will be presenting

Making Math Magical: Summer Edition:
How to use the summer to catch up or get ahead
(without burning out or going crazy)
for parents (of students 4th-12th grade)

While summer is the perfect time to catch up on math or get ahead, students typically lose 2.6 months of grade level learning in math each summer. Many families, even those who enthusiastically embrace summer reading, feel overwhelmed or completely lost when it comes to getting started with doing summer math.

Come learn how you can use the summer so your child can catch up or get ahead with math without having it be a boring, stressful chore, but actually magical, meaningful, fun, and effective, so your child is competent and confident.

You will learn how to:

-create achievable and meaningful summer math goals
-find summer materials that really work for you
-plan, pace and schedule yourself and your child
-fun ways to learn math on the go or on vacation
-access the magic that comes from true math mastery

Everyone will leave with specific tools and strategies to take home and use immediately.

I will be sharing the three big practices that completely transformed my life as a mathematician and performing artist.
Come and bring your friends!

Talk title: Making Math Magical: Summer Edition:
How to use the summer to catch up or get ahead (without burning out or going crazy)
Audience: for parents (of students 4th-12th grade)
Date: Tonight, Tues 7/11
Time: 6:30-8 pm
Location: Park Slope branch of the Brooklyn Public Library
431 6th Ave,
Brooklyn, NY 11215
Cost: Free and open to the public

#ParkSlope #Brooklyn #BKLYN #BrooklynPublicLibrary #MathMastery #MakingMathMagical #MathJoy #mathanxiety #mathworkshopforparents

Posts Tagged as "math joy"

Making Math Magical at the Manalapan, NJ Public Library: Monday, 3/20

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

[NJ math butterfly forecast] Come and join me in Manalapan, NJ to learn how to make math magical and raise a math-confident daughter or son! Monday, 3/20, 6.30-7.30 pm!

Talk title: Making Math Magical: How to Raise a Math-Confident Daughter or Son

Audience: This talk is for parents of students from 6th through 12th grade who are having trouble with math and know something needs to change.

Date: Monday, 3/20

Time: 6.30-7.30 pm

Location: Headquarters Branch of the Monmouth County Library
125 Symmes Drive
Manalapan, NJ 07726-3249

Cost: Free and open to the public.

Please spread the word to families you think may be interested.

I would love to see you there!

Sending you love,
REBECCA
#makingmathmagical #Manalapan #Monmouth #MonmouthPublicLibrary #ManalapanPublicLibrary #NewJersey #NJ #mathforparents #mathconfidence #mathanxiety #mathjoy #makingmathmagical #STEM #STEAM #MATHMASTERY

Posts Tagged as "math joy"

End the Math Freakout: at the Montclair NJ Public Library, Sun 3/19

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

Come and join me in Montclair, NJ to learn how to end the math freakout and raise a math-confident daughter! Sunday, 3/19, 3-4 pm! (Yes, back-to-back NJ speaking engagements!)

Talk Title: End the Math Freakout: How to Raise a Math-Confident Daughter (for Parents)

Audience: This talk is for parents of students from 4th grade through high school who are having trouble with math and know that something needs to change.

Date: Sunday, 3/19

Time: 3-4 pm

Location: Montclair Public Library – Main Library
50 South Fullerton Avenue
Montclair, New Jersey 07042

Cost: Free and open to the public

Please spread the word to parents and kids you think might be interested.

I would love to see you there!

Sending you love,
REBECCA

#mathforparents #Montclair #NJ #NewJersey #MontclairPublicLibrary #mathanxiety #mathconfidence #mathmastery #makingmathmagical #endthemathfreakout #mathgirls #mathemotions #mathjoy #STEM #STEAM #MATHMASTERY

Posts Tagged as "math joy"

Case Study: A 5th grader goes from believing “math doesn’t like me” to singing and dancing about math while wearing her purple tutu

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

When this fifth grade student first came to me, her mom told me, “My daughter is joyful about everything in her life – except for math.” This student was so anxious and uncertain about math that she refused to do her homework unless she was literally sitting next to her mom. She would tell her mom, “math doesn’t like me.”

This put a lot of pressure and stress on her mom, who was doing everything she could to try to help her daughter succeed at math, but she felt like she she was failing her daughter and being a “bad mother” because she couldn’t find a solution. The mom felt anxious picking her daughter up from school because she wasn’t sure whether or not her daughter would have a math temper tantrum. And even though when her daughter would express her feelings of math inadequacy, she was really just asking for help, it was so stressful for the mom that the mom sometimes would react with frustration just because she was so worn down from the seemingly endless math stress.

2013-09-04_2102

I started working with this student towards the end of her fifth grade school year. Because this student loves to dance and sing and has a great passion for musical theater, I started teaching her math songs to help her remember different concepts and formulas. We also really focused on filling in the gaps and building a strong foundation.

Midway through the summer, this student started spontaneously singing her math problems! She would make up these little operas about all the different math operations she was doing – as well as songs just about math concepts in general, with sophisticated lyrics that showed she really got the concepts. She would even come to some of her sessions wearing her purple tutu. I was overjoyed to see her expressing herself so confidently and creatively with math, even with her outfits. At the same time, her mom and I also weren’t yet sure how this would transfer to the classroom.

Her first day back at school, her first middle school math class of 6th grade, the teacher asked a question, and my student just couldn’t help herself – she shouted out, “It’s because of the commutative property!” It turned out that no one else in her class – even the students she thought of as being very strong mathematicians – had even heard of the commutative property before! This was a huge boost to my student’s confidence and enjoyment!

2013-10-06_2102

Since her first day back at school as a sixth grader, she has consistently made 90s or 100s on every single math test and quiz she’s taken – except for one! On this test, she got an 88%, and what is so interesting is that this absolutely didn’t defeat her.

When she talked about it with her mom, the focus was just about making sure to get the test back from the teacher, so we could go over what she didn’t understand in our tutoring sessions and learn from it. In some ways this was an even bigger victory than the tests where she scored higher, because it showed how much her mindset had shifted. We could see her resilience in how she dealt with a lower grade, and how her attitude had shifted to “I’ll get it, because I know I can get it.”

Just as important, the mom’s experience has shifted dramatically now that she isn’t the one who is helping her daughter with math. She shared with me that when she comes home from work, it’s easy for her energy to be fully engaged with her daughter because it isn’t sapped by worrying about helping her with her math homework right away. She can just decompress and regroup and be energized and be a good parent. And her daughter has become so much more independent that the mom can be reading a book in another room while her daughter is doing her homework on her own!

How did we create this totally awesome math transformation? Let me tell you all about it!

2013-09-04_2103

1. Positive, relaxed environment. We fostered an environment of trust and camaraderie. Our work together is committed and also relaxed; this student is totally free to make mistakes, ask questions, or go over whatever it is she needs to go over, no matter what.

2. Dealing with math feelings.
When this student is overjoyed, anxious, or heartbroken, we deal with it together head-on. There was one session very early on where she (quite understandably) cried because she was so disappointed and frustrated with a recent grade. Instead of squelching this or ending the session, we just talked it out, making a safe space for her to feel, express, and release her frustration and disappointment. Other times she was so happy with what she was learning and accomplishing that she would dance and sing with glee and pride!

3. Consciously fostering a “growth mindset” with math. This student has an awesome “growth mindset” when it comes to her work in musical theater. She will audition over and over again for the same Broadway show, and instead of getting discouraged if she hasn’t gotten a part yet, she is just really excited about the process and the experience.

At the same time, there have been periods where she has really expressed more of a “fixed mindset” about math – “you have it or you don’t,” and being worried that she wasn’t one of the ones who “had it.” We deliberately take time to talk about this together and draw parallels with her work in the theater so that she can pull that already-existing growth mindset into her math.

2013-09-04_2103_001

For example, just this week, this student expressed both concern and hope about a state-wide test she was taking the next day. She wanted to score high enough to be selected for state and national math events, and she was also worried that there would be stuff on the test that she didn’t know because she wasn’t in the “honors level class.”

We discussed at length how it’s like if she went to an audition and they asked her to play the bagpipes and do a Scottish accent, she wouldn’t beat herself up for not already knowing how to do those things – after the audition, she would just ask her teachers and coaches to help her learn, if that’s something she was interested in being able to do. Then she shared her philosophy of auditioning, which is that “it’s not just about the part, it’s about the experience, and if you’re not focused on the part, it will just naturally happen.” We drew direct parallels with what she tells herself during her auditions and what she can tell herself during her math tests.


4. Self-expression.
In the context of a supportive environment of trust where all of our work is super individualized, this student started to express herself more and more, whether it was singing the math songs she’d learned, making up her own original math songs, singing herself through the math problem she was working on, wearing her purple tutu, or decorating her problems with hot pink drawings (some of which are included in this very blog post)! Seeing her experience math as a vehicle of self-expression is absolutely encouraged, because it’s a huge sign that the student is getting way more comfortable and also really internalizing the material at a deeper level.

2013-10-06_2101

5. Support is normalized. Just like this student didn’t stop taking voice lessons or going to dance class once she started getting parts in musicals, math support that fosters her autonomy is now just part of her normal routine. Instead of saying, “Well, now her grades are higher, she’s done with math mentoring,” this student and her parents have recommitted to receiving support so that she can just continue to grow her math abilities and confidence more and more, and that her family can experience an even deeper experience of harmony around math.

I am so, so proud of this student, and how her persistence, vulnerability, and commitment has created such true mastery, confidence, and JOY with her math!

Are you tired of feeling like a bad parent because even though you’re doing everything you can to help your kid with math, it isn’t working?

Does it break your heart to see your own purple-tutu-wearing kid have meltdowns about math?

Are you ready to invest in high-level support?

Just click here to get started with your special application for my one-on-one math tutoring programs.

Once your application is received, we’ll set up a special phone call to get clear if my approach would be a good fit for your child.

I can’t wait to hear from you!

Sending you love,
REBECCA

Related Posts:
Case Study: A Rising 8th grader masters her summer math packet
Case study: A seventh grader goes from “I don’t get it” to getting 100 percents
Case Study: an ADHD student goes from a D to an A
I just can’t keep this a secret any longer

Posts Tagged as "math joy"

Do you wish your kid could feel like Albert Einstein?

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

My student who loves to sing and dance about math boldly announced to me during our tutoring session, “I feel like Albert Einstein!”

Ok, so let’s back up for a second. How did this happen?

When she told me she felt like Albert Einstein, I told her, “I think this is really important. Let’s look at this together for a minute.”

What was the process that led to this lightbulb moment?

Here’s the breakdown.

We were working on a problem that combined multiple circles shapes to make a complicated-looking shape that LOOKED super scary and weird – but was actually just a bunch of circles combined in an innovative way.

When my student first saw the problem, her first thought was, “I don’t want to do this. This is too complicated.” (Initial resistance to the problem.)

Then, she thought, “OK, why don’t we just try it, because if we skip it, I might forget to do it and then I won’t ever get it done or learn from it.” (Willingness to engage with the problem.)

As I was talking to her about the problem, this student started playing around with the diagram, trying to break it into smaller shapes.

Without freaking out or trying to force anything, she just playfully engaged with the problem, without being worried that she “didn’t know how to do it.” (Willingly engaging with the unknown with a sense of playfulness and lightheartedness.)

While she was listening to me, she started getting a mental image of Mickey Mouse ears, and a Mickey Mouse cartoon she had seen where Mickey lost his ears. Then, when Mickey found his ears and put them back on his hat, half of the full circle disappeared into the hat, so only a semicircle stuck out to make the ear.

(Her subconscious started to make non-linear connections. She let her subconscious flow without shutting it down.)

Then my student realized that the same thing was going on in the diagram we were looking at – the little circles were being “stuck” into the big circle and half of them were disappearing.

(Her subconscious/visual mind clearly showed her how to solve a problem she “didn’t know how to do.”)

Then she knew exactly what to do and was off and running! (She immediately applied her flash of insight to successfully solve the problem.)

What makes me SO HAPPY about this is… very advanced scientists, mathematicians, and inventors often rely on their creativity and their subconscious mind to solve the problems that really stretch the limits of their current understanding.

But you don’t have to wait until you’re in graduate school or interning at CERN to start working with your creativity and subconscious to solve problems.

In fact, you can start right now… even if you’re “just” a rising 7th grader!

Here’s how you, too, can start to invite more Albert Einstein moments into your math learning:

1. Be willing to engage with the unknown. When you see a scary problem that looks unfamiliar, instead of shutting down and saying, “I don’t know how to do this,” or, “I need someone else to show me what to do,” just say to yourself, “Why not just take a look at this and see what happens?”

2. Let yourself play with the problem and explore. You don’t have to know what to do. Try to break it down into something you do know how to do. Look at it from different perspectives. It doesn’t have to make sense immediately.

3. Remember that it doesn’t have to be linear and you don’t have to force it. Just hold the problem lightly in your mind while you are exploring.

4. If you start to get some unrelated images or ideas, let them come through. Maybe they will show you how to solve the problem!

5. If you do have a lightbulb moment of insight, go ahead and apply it to the problem and solve! This is so satisfying!

6. VERY IMPORTANT: If you don’t solve the problem right away, it’s OK to take a break and come back to it later. (In fact, professional mathematicians and scientists do this on purpose! And many of the most important problems of their careers took them months or even years to solve.)

7. ALSO VERY IMPORTANT: Even if you DON’T solve the problem, practicing deliberately being with the unknown is incredibly valuable.

I’ve come to realize that deliberately being with the unknown and having the courage to experiment is maybe the most important skill we can learn in math and in life. To me, it is an incredible meta-skill that allows so many other beautiful learnings, creations, and opportunities to come through. Unfortunately, it’s something that is not mentioned or encouraged in most educational environments.

Just as an example of how this skill is developed as part of my work, when this student first came to me, what was going on was if she didn’t immediately know what to do, she would give up right away and ask her Mom to show her how to do the problem.

Now she her instinct is to explore, instead of give up, and she is living in a completely different world.

Is this a transformation you would like your child to also experience – from giving up as soon as they don’t know what to do, to having their own moments where they feel like Albert Einstein after a blinding flash of insight?

Then I invite you to apply to my super powerful one-on-ones tutoring programs.

Just click here to get started with your special application for my one-on-one math tutoring programs.

Once your application is received, we’ll set up a special phone call to get clear on what’s going on in your kid’s math situation and whether or not it’s a fit for us to work together. (This level of attention to incoming families is unparalleled in the tutoring industry!)

I’m excited to connect!

Related posts:
Does having a math tutor make you a “loser”?
Case study: a 5th grader goes from thinking “math doesn’t like me” to singing and dancing about math while wearing a purple tutu
I just can’t keep this a secret any longer
How to experience math as your own unique creation
Is your kid a creative, passionate, unique visionary of the future?